Blogoversary Day 11: Patricia Snodgrass

Jen: Today we welcome Patricia Snodgrass to Romancing the Book. Patricia, will you please share a short bio with us?

Patricia: I am a freelance writer living in a very rural area of North East Texas. I live so close to Louisiana I can smell the gumbo cooking. I’m married, have one son, an akita and two cats. I am of French, English and Cherokee descent if anyone is interested in that kind of thing.

Jen: Tell us about Glorious and where is can be purchased.

Patricia: My latest publication is entitle Glorious. You can find it at any brick and mortar store, on Amazon or you can purchase a copy at my publisher’s website. http://www.mundania.com/author.php?author=Patricia+Snodgrass

It’s not exactly a romance per se, it’s listed under historical and suspense, but there is lots of romance in the novel and you don’t have to hunt to find it.

The story takes place in a small town in Overton, Arkansas during the Civil Right’s Era and the story revolves around three families: The Wilkes family, the Gilmer family and the Tenkiller family. Laura Gilmer marries Stan because she is sick and broke, but feels she could learn to love him in time. Stan however is dangerously insane and an abusive control freak who does love Laura but can’t get past his illness. Jaydene and Marcus Sr. have been married for many years, are a loving couple. They are a middle class African American family…Jaydene being a registered nurse and Marcus is a loan manager. They love each other more than life itself, and when their daughter Glorious is killed, it tests their love in ways they never could have imagined. The Tenkiller family, Maggie and Ellis Tenkiller, are from Cherokee Nation and they and their two children are the only Cherokees in the area. Maggie and Ellis are working class people, and not much is said about their relationship except that they live their lives as traditional Cherokee. The children of these three families are the focus in the story. There is a budding romance between Willy Tenkiller and Emily Prudhomme, Laura’s daughter, but it is cut tragically short. However, that thread gets picked up in the second novel. Glorious is intense and there are some strongly suspenseful passages, and there is some controversy. But I don’t think this story is any more intense than Toni Morrison’s Sula or Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.

Jen: At what age did you discover writing? When where you first published? Tell us your call story.

Patricia: I discovered writing when I was around five years old. It’s a strong memory and if I close my eyes I can still see it quite clearly.

We lived in the Cherokee Nation then, and I remember sitting on a counter of an old grocery store. While my father and several men were outside talking, the shop keeper would give me a Red Man tablet and a box of Crayons. He’d show me how to write in Cherokee script. I’ve been fascinated by words ever since. It’s funny, I thought that the shop owner was ancient, but when I asked my dad he told me the man was only in his mid twenties.

Jen: How does your family feel about your career?

Patricia: My husband, son, and brother are very supportive.

Jen: Do you have any “must haves” with you while you’re writing?

Patricia: Peace and quiet. Years ago I would write with the radio blaring but now that I’ve gotten older I find that it bothers me. I wonder if at some point I’ll start shouting at kids to get off my lawn.

Jen: Do you have a theme, object or person that appears in all of your stories?

Patricia: There are connections between the characters, places and incidents that tend to run through my stories. You’ll meet Little Pete, in Glorious, for example, who was later killed in Mercer’s Bayou. All my stories except for one has a connection with the area surrounding the town of Overton. Overton draws evil the way a corpse draws flies.

Jen: What is it about the romance genre that appeals to you?

Patricia: What appeals to me most about the romance genre has less to do with contemporary romance than it does with older romance themes, especially when it comes to movies. I still think Humphrey Bogart—who wasn’t the most attractive leading man, by the way, but still made women swoon—seethed sexuality. He and Lauren Bacall completed each other. There is something about those two that give me goose bumps, in the best possible way, of course. And I still love the way Claude Rains and Bette Davis gazed at each other during the end of Now, Voyager. Romance was palpable, you knew they loved each other…there was no reason to get into bed to show it, it was in their eyes, in the way they held each other close. I loved that. I still do. I try to incorporate that into my stories, even the ones that aren’t totally romance. In my novel Glorious, for example, the love scene that still tugs most deeply at my heart is between long time married couple Jaydene and Marcus Sr. When their daughter was killed Marcus began to loose his grip on reality, and in a sudden rage struck his wife and fled. Without a second thought, Jaydene went after him. She gathered her family and they searched until they found Marcus sleeping in a fleabag hotel. She didn’t judge him or scream at him, nor did she threaten him with divorce, but she did convince him that he needed help and that he should come with them to the hospital. I still get a lump in my throat when I ‘heard’ Jaydene say, “Where you go, I will go…” That’s the kind of true love I put into my novels. It’s not always sexy, it’s not always hot, and sometimes it’s damned messy, but it is as real and as deep as I can pull from my heart and put on a page. Metaphorically speaking, of course.

Jen: Do you feel as if the characters live with you as you write? Do they haunt your dreams?

Patricia: yes. My niece who has a degree in psychology tells me I’m not normal because of it.

Jen: Who has inspired you as an author?

Patricia: My father at first. He was a great story teller. Then later I developed a love for reading that continues to this day. My greatest inspiration as an author comes from the book To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. I still read that book every summer. And of course Stephen King and Dean Koontz are inspirations, especially their earlier works.

Jen: What did you do to celebrate your first book?

Patricia: My husband took me out to my favorite restaurant.

Jen: What do you do in your free time?

Patricia: Garden, do Native American beadwork, paint, crochet, enjoy time with my family. Read..read…read…

Jen: What’s next for you?

Patricia: My erotic romance Marilyn is due out in August. It’s about a haunted car that has perks. In fact, the perks are so good Bobby Chandler may never leave the garage! Heh heh. There is another novel coming out soon called The Man Who Loved Yolanda Dodson. I don’t have a publication date on that yet, and it is pure romance, some erotica too. And it’s told from a man’s point of view, so that should interest some readers. Wild Swans, another paranormal romance is under consideration at Mundania now as well. And I’m currently working on the sequel to Glorious entitled Glorious Arising. It’s less intense than the original but is still very good. I’m over halfway finished with it.

Also, you can find all my books at Mundania Press with the exception of Mercer’s Bayou which is published by Samhain Publishing.

Jen: Where can you be found on the web?

Patricia: I spend most of my time on my facebook account. It’s a real time killer.  http://www.facebook.com/patricia.snodgrass.  My twitter id is woverfm.  My website is http://patriciasnodgrass.bravehost.com/ and I also have a Redroom Account. You can find me there under the name Patricia Snodgrass

Jen: Is there anything you’d like to ask our readers?

Patricia: What does romance mean to you? Please comment. I always enjoy reading comments.

Contest details:

  • The prize is a pdf of Glorious.
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  • The contest ends on Sunday, July 17.

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