Review: "Save as Draft" by Cavanaugh Lee

Reviewer: Stephanie

Blurb: A love triangle evolving over e-mails, texts, and Facebook messages that makes you wonder if the things we leave unsaid — or rather unsent — could change the story of our lives.
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Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011
From: Izabell
To: Reader
Subject: Save as Draft
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Are we Facebook friends yet? I’m the wactress (waitress/actress) turned lawyer who lives her life online. Anyway, I’ve got this problem. There’s this guy Peter. He’s my best friend and co-worker, and we just started dating, which is potentially a huge mistake. But that’s not all. There’s this other guy, Marty from eHarm, and he ran with the bulls in Spain. I can’t get him off my mind. What a mess. I’d love your advice if you can take a second out of your crazy, high-tech life. Shoot me an e-mail, text me, or BBM. And friend me if you haven’t already! You can find me on Facebook under Save as Draft.

Izabell




Review: Save as Draft is a charming novel that’s bound to leave you hanging and frustrated at end, the very first epistolary fiction piece I’ve read since Paula Danziger’s Snail Mail, No More. Written entirely in emails, text messages, and Twitter updates, this book is sweepingly honest, as well as full of emotion. There lies a secret thrill in being able to peek inside someone’s private life, especially in an era that is so dependent on internet communication.

Cavanaugh Lee does not stop there. The essence of Save as Draft delves even deeper than the privacy of a password-protected email account, because the reader gets the inside scoop on what the characters don’t. Emails that have been “saved as draft” or in less-techy terms, written but unsent, are revealed, opening up a whole nother road in knowing what the characters are actually thinking.

Izzy and Peter, the engaged couple, seemingly have everything paved out ahead of them. But miscommunication and too many saved drafts take a toll on the passionate relationship. You’ll love reading how their relationship builds, climaxes, and abruptly falls, making you both cringe(because of how closely this hits to home — this might as well be YOUR love life in YOUR email account) and smile (from the wit and the glad-it-wasn’t-me! incidents) all within the same page.
I love how the plot is conveyed through Facebook notifications (Izabell Chin has added you as a friend on Facebook) and eHarmony profiles to develop characters. It’s a fun, flirty way to get to know the protagonists and the main conflicts.

The ending made me so mad, but I couldn’t have made it any more perfect. I won’t give any spoilers, but I will say that it was sort of a tragic ending. Meaning, things do not end happily-ever-after as predicted. The ending is happy yes, just not the way I had thought it would be. Save as Draft is a heartbreakingly realistic novel that demonstrates human error in the ways we never speak what we think…and never think what we say speak either.

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